Categories
Photography

Able Was I Ere I Saw Alba

Able Was I Ere I Saw Alba
Pigment ink print on archival paper
24×24″
Edition of 3
2013

Alba was the name of a genetically modified “glowing” rabbit created as an artistic work by artist Eduardo Kac, produced in collaboration with French geneticist Louis-Marie Houdebine. Houdebine used a gene found in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria that fluoresces green when exposed to blue light. When Alba was exposed to such light, she too would glow green.

“Able was I, ere I saw Elba” is a well-known palindrome often attributed to the French leader Napoleon Bonaparte, who was once exiled to the island of Elba. More likely the palindrome was created in 1848 by someone with the initials J.T.R and residing in Baltimore, Maryland.

Categories
News

Foundations of Digital Art and Design

Foundations of Digital Art and Design is now available from Pearson/New Riders.

I contributed to the chapter on Revision Practices in Media Art and Design, where I discuss my work The Sky Is Falling (A Day in the Life).

From Pearson:

All students of digital design and production–whether learning in a classroom or on their own–need to understand the basic principles of design. These principles are often excluded from books that teach software. Foundations of Digital Art and Design with the Adobe Creative Cloud reinvigorates software training by integrating design exercises into tutorials fusing design fundamentals and core Adobe Creative Cloud skills. The result is a comprehensive design learning experience.

Interviews with or essay contributions by Pencilbox Studios, riCardo Crespo, Michael Demers, The League of Imaginary Scientists, and Jovenville.

Categories
News

Future Learning Spaces: Conference Proceedings

The Sky Is Falling (A Day in the Life) was featured as part of the Future Learning Spaces conference at Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland in November. The conference proceedings have recently been published and are available as a free download from Aalto Press.

Categories
Digital Media

low_resolution_wormhole

low_resolution_wormhole
Laser print on paper
11×8.5″
Edition of 5
2012

Exhibited at:
“PAPERWORKS” invitational exhibition, FICTILIS, Oakland, CA.
“COLLISION20” juried exhibition, Boston Cyberarts Gallery, Boston, MA.

Categories
News

Book Review of “Net Works” in Visual Communication Quarterly

A review of Net Works: Case Studies in Web Art and Design has been written by Karie Hollerback for the April-June 2013 issue of Visual Communication Quarterly.

I contributed to Chapter 1: Formalism and Conceptual Art, where I discuss my work Color Field Paintings (Browser).

Categories
Photography

Ghosts

Ghosts
Pigment ink prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag
30×40″ each
Edition of 5
2011

Found images of ghosts with descriptive text provided by the photographer (or someone with knowledge of the photo). In an attempt to remove image noise, the photographs were repeatedly blurred by a Gaussian function until their most basic elements were left, revealing the visual essences of the ghosts.

“I found it interesting to not only further abstract what were, in most cases, already very vague images of apparitions, orbs, and lights, but to combine those abstracted images with the text as supplied by the photographer (or someone with knowledge of the photo). In a way, the text is both a necessary element to provide a context to these formless fields of color, and also an interesting gauge of how we look at and contextualize the unknown (the text from one photo reads: “This was taken at Barnsley Gardens in Georgia last April 2007. There was nothing in this room to cause this orb/ectoplasm to be in this photo. This is incredible and probably the single most amazing ghost pic I’ve ever seen, let alone taken.”)…”

Categories
News

Net Works: Case Studies in Web Art and Design

Net Works: Case Studies in Web Art and Design is now available from Routledge Press.

I contributed to Chapter 1: Formalism and Conceptual Art, where I discuss my work Color Field Paintings (Browser).

From Routledge:

Net Works offers an inside look into the process of successfully developing thoughtful, innovative digital media. In many practice-based art texts and classrooms, technology is divorced from the socio-political concerns of those using it. Although there are many resources for media theorists, practice-based students sometimes find it difficult to engage with a text that fails to relate theoretical concerns to the act of creating. Net Works strives to fill that gap.

Using websites as case studies, each chapter introduces a different style of web project–from formalist play to social activism to data visualization–and then includes the artists’ or entrepreneurs’ reflections on the particular challenges and outcomes of developing that web project. Scholarly introductions to each section apply a theoretical frame for the projects. A companion website offers further resources for hands-on learning.

Combining practical skills for web authoring with critical perspectives on the web, Net Works is ideal for courses in new media design, art, communication, critical studies, media and technology, or popular digital/internet culture.

Categories
Miscellany

Mallwalker Jerseys

Mallwalker Jerseys
Custom embroidered and heat pressed Adidias jerseys
2010

Categories
Digital Media

The Sky Is Falling (A Day in the Life…)

The Sky Is Falling (A Day in the Life…)
Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion / 12:00am to 11:59pm, Heartfire 11, 3E433
Digital video, 24 two-minute segments
2010

Exhibited at:
“post_space” solo exhibition, Conant Gallery, Groton, MA.
“Future Learning Spaces,” DOEL, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland.
The Wrong – Digital Art Biennale: Homeostasis Lab, São Paulo, Brazil.
“Beep Bop Boop” juried exhibition, FATVillage Projects, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.
“Anthropocene” juried exhibition, Fuse Factory, Pearl Conard Art Gallery, Ohio State University, Mansfield, OH.

This work consists of captured Sony PlayStation3 video from Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion, edited to reflect the seamless passing of game time and “real” time. One minute of “real” time equals approximately 30 minutes of game time. The resulting 24 two-minute videos record the passing of one game day.

References to playable characters, AI characters, and accompanying sound effects have been edited from the video in an effort to focus on the notion of a virtual space with the possibility of non-virtual habitation, defined in part by the passing of game time during the observers “real” time. The health meter, magic meter, stamina meter, weapon and magic selections and the game compass have been unedited as a digital referent in the hyperreal environment of the game engine.

The footage was captured using the Haupauge HD PVR, and edited on a MacBook Pro using Final Cut Pro. The 24 html pages were built in Adobe Dreamweaver, and use javascript to call a specific page (and the embedded video) based upon the users local time (ex: If someone is viewing the page at 3:40pm local time, video15, containing footage from 3:00 to 3:59pm game time, will be played). An additional piece of javascript tells the browser to refresh itself every two minutes, to ensure that subsequent videos will load appropriately.

Made possible by the “Terminal: Internet Based Artwork” grant, Austin Peay State University.

Categories
Digital Media

The Ghost of Vannevar Bush Hacked My Server

The Ghost of Vannevar Bush Hacked My Server
Browser window
2009

Included in:
Rhizome Curated ArtBase (New Museum, New York).

Exhibited at:
“Zeroes + Ones: The Digital Era” exhibition, Climate Gallery, Long Island City, NY.
“Appropriation Art 2” juried exhibition, Zagreb AKC Medika, Zagreb, Croatia.
“Sight.Sound [Interaction] 5” invitational exhibition, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD.
“Binaries” juried exhibition, Idea Lab, Athens, GA.
“PixelPops!2013” juried exhibition, Isaac Delgado Fine Arts Gallery, New Orleans, LA
The Wrong – Digital Art Biennale: Homeostasis Lab, (São Paulo, Brazil).

Vannevar Bush was an engineer and science administrator best known for his role in the development of the atomic bomb and the memex, an adjustable microfilmviewer which laid the foundation for the structure of the Internet. He believed in technological innovation as the path to economic and geopolitical security, but at the height of the Cold War his feelings shifted when he saw that technology lead away from understanding and toward destruction. He died in 1974.

On October 28, 2009 an image appeared to flash on a web server. Comprised of 0s and 1s (binary code — the elemental language of computers), the image closely resembled that of Vannevar Bush. The code from that page was copied and pasted into a blank page, effectively “capturing” this ghost of Vannevar Bush. He appears at random, having hacked my server he now haunts it for all of eternity…


Click here to see what Vannevar has done.